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Unemployment, With or Without the Stimulus

C.M. Phippen

While listening to an interview with Joe Biden’s chief economic advisor, Jared Bernstein, I heard what sounded like an admission that the White House hadn’t necessarily expected the stimulus bill to hold unemployment at a rate any lower than was already the “consensus” estimated rate.  Larry Kudlow, on The Kudlow Report, asked Bernstein about the promise made by the White House that if the stimulus bill were passed quickly, the unemployment rate would not exceed 8%;  it currently stands around 9.6%.

Mr. Bernstein responded by saying that during the fourth quarter of 2008, the consensus was that 8% would be the height of unemployment in this country.  He went on to say, “We were right with the central forecast.  We did not know that the, nor did any other, hardly any other economists, that the unemployment rate was headed up so quickly, that the economy was headed off a cliff . . .”

Okay, I get it.  You spoke before you realized the extent of the recession, and hey, who knew a consensus could be wrong, right?

But wait, Obama wasn’t yet in office in the fourth quarter of 2008.  The president had not at that time even submitted a stimulus plan to be considered by those formulating the “consensus,” had he?

I’ve attempted to contact the White House to for clarification; I’ve rewound my TiVo and watched it again; I’ve emailed The Kudlow Report to see if they can get clarification.  If this administration made a promise to us that unemployment wouldn’t exceed the level they now claim was the “consensus”  maximum even before a stimulus bill, if we would only spend over $800 billion, then we all just got shafted.

Not only did unemployment far exceed the promised 8% maximum, but I can only assume the administration didn’t  have much confidence in the effectiveness of their own bill, the one that just had to be passed right now!  If they did believe it would actually “create or save” a significant number of jobs, it only makes sense that they would have taken the consensus peak unemployment rate and reduced it by the percentage of jobs they planned on saving or creating.  I understand, though, not wanting to overpromise.

On the other hand, the fact that they took the consensus peak and assured us their $860 billion bill to reduce unemployment would keep us below that already assumed high, and then it still didn’t, doesn’t bode well for all of us who weren’t close enough to the administration to get our own big fat stimulus check.  Nor does it bode well for our children and grandchildren, who will be paying for those checks for years to come.

Watch the video here (the portion I reference starts right around 6:10 if you don’t want to watch the full 12 minutes):


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