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“Our practical choice is not between a tax-cut deficit and budgetary surplus. It is between two kinds of deficits: a chronic deficit of inertia, as the unwanted result of inadequate revenues and a restricted economy; or a temporary deficit of transition, resulting from a tax cut designed to boost the economy, increase tax revenues, and achieve . . . a budget surplus.” John F. Kennedy

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Jul 24 2012

Stimulus and Economic Growth?

C.M. Phippen

According to a recent interview with Larry Kudlow, Alan Greenspan admitted that, much to his surprise, the economic stimulus had a negative effect on the economy. The data showed that not only had it not been stimulative, it was actually detrimental to economic growth. Our government spent nearly $1 trillion and it not only did nothing to “stimulate” growth, it actually hindered it.

That makes sense, based on a little statement by Jared Bernstein a couple of years ago. I wrote about it at the time. Bernstein was the chief economic advisor to Vice President Joe Biden and he stated that the consensus among economists was that unemployment would not rise above 8 percent. This consensus ostensibly existed independent of any plans by the administration to pass a stimulus bill that amounted to nearly $1 trillion of borrowed money, as it existed in the fall of 2008 and prior to Obama entering the White House. Apparently the administration was as surprised as Alan Greenspan to find that the stimulus did precisely opposite what our president told us it would do.

One could expect any open-minded, non-idealogical leader to learn from the events of the past few years and change course; reconsider the policies that have stunted economic growth and harmed millions of Americans.

When asked recently by a reporter why President Obama hadn’t met with his jobs council in over six months, Jay Carney’s response was that the President “has a lot on his plate.” Of course, he has attended over 100 fundraisers and is a prolific golfer and entertainer of celebrities.

But back to the economic reality that the rest of the country must face every day, a recent study by Ernst & Young claims that we will experience a loss of over 700,000 jobs if the Bush tax cuts are not extended for upper income earners. If legislation extending those tax cuts for upper earners crosses his desk, Obama apparently will veto it.

On a number of occasions, when confronted with the evidence that raising certain tax rates reduces federal revenue and cutting those rates increases revenue, Obama’s response has been that he would still raise taxes on the rich for reasons of “fairness.” One must assume he just isn’t interested in the effect of such policies on the broader economy.

Then there’s Sen. Patty Murray’s recent comment that if the Republicans won’t cave to the Democrats by helping them to pass legislation that would exempt top earners from an extension of the Bush tax cuts (remember, costing our economy an additional 700,000 jobs) then the Democrats should allow all of the tax cuts to expire. According to Citigroup, if this were to happen we could expect a 4 percent hit to growth in 2013. Even if Congress extends the “middle-class” income tax cuts and allows all others to expire, we can expect a 2.9 percent decline in growth.

This in an economy that has only been growing at around 1.7 percent for the past two years. Either of these options would most likely swiftly throw us back into recession. But of course in this political machination (most likely non-idealogical), I’m sure Pres. Obama and Sen. Murray are only looking out for the middle class and poor, who actually need a job to get by.

Then there’s this remark from Alan Greenspan in the same interview, where he said that the largest problem with our debt (the Peter G. Peterson Foundation has been telling us this for a very long time) is entitlements, specifically Medicare. The solution to the debt problem for this administration was to add to our entitlements, specifically health care, in such a way that anybody who is capable of performing simple mathematical functions is completely aware will cost us multiple trillions of dollars every decade and most likely many times that.

I’m just wondering, after this administration has, through it’s policies of fairness, pushed more working-class Americans out of jobs, decimating the income of the average consumer as well as wiping out much of the tax base, who’s going to be left to pay for it all?